GT on the road

That was last week end.

I must say, this car is one of the most impressive thing you can see on the road…

Conversation 14 comments

  1. A shame they don’t make them anymore. In 20 years I wonder what they’ll go for at Barrett Jackson?

  2. i think car companies need to understand that price is the number one reason why people do or dont buy cars. if a car is to expensive, it wont sell. period. people want to get the most for their money. if you are gonna sell a car for 150+, you have the ability to purchase bentley’s, porsches, almost any bmw or mercedes….and it was a ford? who spends that much on a ford?

  3. someone who wants one heck of a car that is modeled after a racing legend would spend that much on a ford.

  4. “i think car companies need to understand that price is the number one reason why people do or dont buy cars. if a car is to expensive, it wont sell. period. people want to get the most for their money. if you are gonna sell a car for 150+, you have the ability to purchase bentley’s, porsches, almost any bmw or mercedes….and it was a ford? who spends that much on a ford?”

    Evidently lots of people do. Ford sold every one of these they could build, and were a relative bargain compared to the competition. Maybe you don’t see it in your world, but not everyone shops for the lowest price. Certainly not in this league. Someone buying a $150k toy likely also owns the brands you mentioned. This car is one rare example of something Ford did right.

  5. The GT suffered not because it cost $150 k, which could have been a bite of it’s problem. The reason the car failed was because of early mechanical problems, probably due to Ford’s not remembering it past history with earlier GT’s, Quick if not delay launch to Market and not quality checking the outsourcing of it’s builder. And I would argue the lack of easy entry/exit of vehicle and lack of sequential gear box. I know most think that a manual is the end all of car enthusiasts, but some wealthy types only want a sequential or automatic option, especially on a vehicle priced so high.

  6. “The reason the car failed was because of early mechanical problems”

    The car didn’t fail at all and with the exception of the F150 and Mustang, is one of Ford’s only recent successes. Its production run was exactly what was planned. Nor did it have “mechanical problems.” Cracks were found in the suspension during testing and never translated to any real mechanical failure. I appreciate their caution and proactive response to what amounted to a non-issue.

  7. “weren’t driving”????
    What does it look like?

    I had to drive. I was on the freeway….

    I always drive and take pictures. Sometimes I read stuff too. Have a beer, or an ice cream.

    I like driving around.

  8. I’ve seen a few of these in downtown Toronto, they always seem to be parked instead of tooling around though.

    The first thing I think of when I do spot one is Ford’s stern “do not drive” fracturing control arm notice shortly after they hit the streets. Not something i’d want people to recall while looking at my $150 000 car.

  9. The success of the GT is shady at best. Some GT sites state that most GT’s are being held by Dealers. FORD can always say it was a success because they sold them all to Dealers, but from my understanding most of them haven’t been sold from Dealers Lot or warehouses. I heard some may be waiting increase it’s exclusivity and get higher prices. Or holding for some future demand to them I say Good Luck with that!

  10. “The first thing I think of when I do spot one is Ford’s stern “do not drive” fracturing control arm notice shortly after they hit the streets. Not something i’d want people to recall while looking at my $150 000 car.”

    If you go wreckedexotics.com you’ll find a disproportionate number of $250k Ferraris and Lambos destroyed from engine fires. So if you don’t like the idea that high performance cars might not be completely flawless, then buy a tepid Camry, which isn’t exactly 100% reliable these days either. The hairline flaw in the GT suspension was caught in testing and all of the cars were fixed as a precautionary measure. There were no actual failures in testing, or since. While Ford hasn’t always been proactive when it comes to recalls, I see their response in this case as being the way an automaker should handle things like this.

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