2022 Honda CR-V: first spy shots…

I didn’t expect to see these so soon. But I guess it makes sense since a new CR-V is usually due out soon after the new Civic. Which is scheduled for next month.

Plus, the CR-V has become the most important model for Honda in the US. 

What is expected, is the design. Which resembles the new HR-V. It follows the more angular trend of new Honda designs. Which means, it might also lose a bit of personality. Just like the HR-V. At the same time, it could gain a cleaner look. The front end of the current CR-V alone is quite a mess.

2021 is shaping out to be quite a year for Honda. With a new Civic, CR-V, and HR-V. As well as the new Acura MDX and S-Type versions of the TLX and MDX. 

More pix of the 2022 Honda CR-V HERE.

 

Conversation 11 comments

  1. I dont like that these SUVs get larger and larger; I like the first generation size. They need build something that size.

  2. It looks less silly than the current one. I suspect the interior is going to be sparse like the new Civic.

  3. Bo-ring. Honda design has taken a turn for the worse. And it starting with the ungainly looking current generation Accord.

  4. I've owned 2 CRVs. Last one (2014 CRV EX AWD 2.4) was wrecked, & I had to replace it quickly. Bought a 2017 CPO Ford Escape SE 2.0T FWD. The Ford is definitely quieter and waay more powerful than the CRV. I can merge onto highways and making passing maneuvers more safely when needed. But the Ford is not as space efficient either. Ford Sync 3 w/ Navi is also better than the telematics system in my wife's 2018 Accord EXL 2.0T. I just hope they put a 2.0t in the new CRV at least as an option. Even if it is detuned a bit. The old 2.4 was buzzy when pushed and slow. Oil dilution issue on 1.5 T bothers me, and that is a tiny engine to move something that heavy with the aerodynamics of a brick. Hope to see the new one in person soon.

  5. Agreed – it's too much. This trend of squaring off front ends to make SUVs look truck-like accentuates rather than hides existing front drive overhangs. It's an odd trend given tighter pedestrian safety standards.

  6. First thing I saw too, especially in comparison to the pic of the current generation. That alone could ruin the design.

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